Wednesday, January 16, 2019
    Every bakery has a menu that is the core of their business. It's what gets customers coming in and it directs all your business decisions. This is why you should ask yourself 3 questions before you add an item to your menu.
Is There A Market For It?
   This is actually a lot of smaller questions wrapped into one. For example, someone somewhere definitely wants pure prune fruitcake, but are there enough people asking for it to make it a regular part of your baking routine? Are the people who want prune fruitcake part of your normal clientele, and, if it isn't, would it attract enough people who would also like your other items? Is this a trendy item that stands out so much that it is worth making for a couple weeks to capitalize on the interest? Answering these questions before you put an item on your menu can save you from a lot of wasted pastries. 
What Does It Cost To Create?
    Every baked good costs a certain amount to make and that cost includes such things as wear on the equipment and the ingredients that you use. Do you have to buy a special ingredient that you will only use for this one item on your menu? The item might need special equipment to make, too. It's important to work out how much you spend to make something before adding it to a menu so you can calculate if it is worth the investment and how you can price it appropriately.
How Does An Item Fit Into Your Business?
   You have already set a certain tone for your bakery, partly by the decorations in the store and the advertising, but mostly by the type of things you sell. So, before you add an item to your menu, you have to ask if it contributes to the tone. Does it fit the niche you cater to? Does it fit into your business's general outlook? For instance, it might make sense to add cheesecakes to your cake shop, but it might not make much sense in a bakery focusing on health food. 
    If you do decide to add items to your menu and you need equipment to bake them, you are in luck. Topos Mondial sells refurbished and new bakery equipment, and we pride ourselves on the variety and quality of the items they have. Please feel free to contact us.
Sunday, December 30, 2018
Whether sweet or savory, bakery delights made from yeast dough are a challenge to produce. Because it is a chemical reaction that makes bread, donuts, and similar products rise, it needs just the right environment. A setting that is too cold, too hot, or contains the wrong amount of humidity will turn a light and airy delectable into a less-than-perfect finished product.
 
The proofer's role in the rising
As described by the Institute of Food Science and Technology, in a warm, moist environment yeast feeds on sugar to ferment and produce carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide fills the dough with tiny bubbles, creating fluffy donuts, tender rolls, or robust whole-grain loaves of bread. A proofing box or cabinet allows the baker to control the environment inside, adjusting it to suit ideally the type of bakery goods it holds. The most critical element in yeast dough preparation is temperature control. The Kansas State University's experimentation lab produced a guide stating that the ideal temperature for yeast bread to rise is between 80 and 85 degrees. Using a proofing box to hold dough as it expands makes controlling the environment possible. Temperatures and resting times for doughnuts and other products vary, so having a programmable holding unit is imperative.
 
Choose your ideal station
We at Topos Mondial Corp. offer a wide range of new and pre-owned proofing boxes, including made-to-order equipment designed for donut production. We have rack systems, some of which include an oven, made of stainless steel and tempered glass doors for easy product monitoring. Let us know if you need a dough conveyance system in your set-up, as we can bring your loaf-baking visions to life. Increase your yeast-based product output and improve the quality of your finished baked goods by equipping your facility with a station that best suits your needs. Contact us today to get started.
Thursday, December 27, 2018
We remember Michael A. Morabito, Jr., a pioneer in the baking industry.
 
Our founder, Michael A. Morabito, Jr., passed away peacefully at home of Parkinson’s disease on Monday, December 24. He was 90. He is survived by his beloved wife of 61 years, Antonette (DiJohn), three children: Michael A. Morabito III (Joanna), Damian (Lauren), and Cassandra (John Trapani) and seven grandchildren. He was preceded in death by 11 siblings.
 
Born in Conshohocken to immigrant parents, he was seventh [7th] of 13 children of the late Michael A. Morabito and Julia (Paglario). He graduated from Norristown High School and attended the University of Miami and Temple University.
 
Mr. Morabito served proudly in the Marines for 2 years and was a Navy pilot for 3 years. Mr. Morabito and his two brothers later took over the family bakery that was started by his father in the garage of their modest home. The bakery grew in scale, and in 1979, Mr. Morabito became the sole owner of Morabito Baking Company in Norristown. Today, his eldest son, Michael A. Morabito III carries on the tradition and leads the successful large wholesale bakery business they built, serving customers both locally and along the east coast. Mr. Morabito was passionate about baking and producing high quality products throughout his life and that focus continues today.
 
In 1962, Mr. Morabito founded Topos Mondial Corporation, a bakery equipment company based in the U.S. The company’s humble start began after the installation of new machinery into his family bakery. After that successful installation, Mr. Morabito became a sales representative for the company which supplied the equipment, the then government-owned Topos a.s. in Czechoslovakia. Mr. Morabito imported the Czech-made automated roll lines for sale into both local Delaware Valley and regional bakeries. After the Prague Spring of 1968 and the start of the cold war, Michael lost the relationship with Topos a.s. and transitioned his efforts at Topos Mondial USA to focus only on pre-owned and rebuilt bakery machinery. In 1987, his second son, Damian joined the company and together they grew the business to have international reach. The company settled in Pottstown and remains there today.
 
In 1999, Mr. Morabito reconnected with Topos a.s. in the Czech Republic, now a privately held company. In 2001, Topos Mondial began selling new bakery machinery made in the Czech Republic into the north American markets...again. Mr. Morabito’s tireless entrepreneurial spirit drove him to purchase an interest in the European company, eventually acquiring the entire company by August 2015. This fulfilled Mr. Morabito’s his lifelong dream of owning the company with which he first connected back in the 1960’s.
 
Today, the company has full global reach and the business embodies the entrepreneurial spirit and focus on growth and service to the industry that always meant so much to Mr. Morabito and his family. Along the way, Mr. Morabito has touched the hearts and spirit of many a baker in the industry that he so loved. His success was measured in his ability to help fellow bakers grow and succeed and to help mentor them as he became a true leader in the industry. His legacy will live on, as it will in the hearts and souls of those he touched.
 
Outside of the businesses, Mr. Morabito enjoyed collecting unique cars, acquiring art glass and gardening around his house, which he loved so much. He was also devoted to his family, particularly his grandchildren, who routinely greeted him with a hug and the familiar phrase, “How’s business Grandpop?”
 
Mr. Morabito was a lifetime member of Holy Savior Church and a generous supporter of the Norristown community.
 
Relatives and friends are invited to attend the viewing on Friday, December 28th from 6 pm to 9 pm or Saturday, December 29th at 10 am, with Mass at 11am. Viewings and mass will be held at Holy Savior Church, 407 E. Main Street, Norristown. Interment will be private. Click here for more information.
 
In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Michael A. Morabito, Jr., may be made to Cirigliano Clinical Excellence Fund. Checks may be made payable to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania and mailed to Penn Medicine Development c/o Kim Grube, 3535 Market Street, Suite 750 Philadelphia PA 19104. Contributions may also be made to Penn Home Care and Hospice, payable to Penn Wissahickon Hospice. Gifts can be mailed to Kelly McBride, Penn Medicine Development Office, 3535 Market Street, Suite 750, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Alternately, a secure online donation can be made on www.PennMedicine.org/hospice-donate

Sunday, October 28, 2018
The proofer's role in the rising

Whether sweet or savory, bakery delights made from yeast dough are a challenge to produce. Because it is a chemical reaction that makes bread, donuts, and similar products rise, it needs just the right environment. A setting that is too cold, too hot, or contains the wrong amount of humidity will turn a light and airy delectable into a less-than-perfect finished product.

The proofer's role in the rising

As described by the Institute of Food Science and Technology, in a warm, moist environment yeast feeds on sugar to ferment and produce carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide fills the dough with tiny bubbles, creating fluffy donuts, tender rolls, or robust whole-grain loaves of bread. A proofing box or cabinet allows the baker to control the environment inside, adjusting it to suit ideally the type of bakery goods it holds. The most critical element in yeast dough preparation is temperature control. The Kansas State University's experimentation lab produced a guide stating that the ideal temperature for yeast bread to rise is between 80 and 85 degrees. Using a proofing box to hold dough as it expands makes controlling the environment possible. Temperatures and resting times for doughnuts and other products vary, so having a programmable holding unit is imperative.

Choose your ideal station

We at Topos Mondial Corp. offer a wide range of new and pre-owned proofing boxes, including made-to-order equipment designed for donut production. We have rack systems, some of which include an oven, made of stainless steel and tempered glass doors for easy product monitoring. Let us know if you need a dough conveyance system in your set-up, as we can bring your loaf-baking visions to life. Increase your yeast-based product output and improve the quality of your finished baked goods by equipping your facility with a station that best suits your needs. Contact us today to get started.

Thursday, October 18, 2018
Ask yourself these 3 questions before you add an item to your menu.

    Every bakery has a menu that is the core of their business. It's what gets customers coming in and it directs all your business decisions. This is why you should ask yourself 3 questions before you add an item to your menu.
Is There A Market For It?
   This is actually a lot of smaller questions wrapped into one. For example, someone somewhere definitely wants pure prune fruitcake, but are there enough people asking for it to make it a regular part of your baking routine? Are the people who want prune fruitcake part of your normal clientele, and, if it isn't, would it attract enough people who would also like your other items? Is this a trendy item that stands out so much that it is worth making for a couple weeks to capitalize on the interest? Answering these questions before you put an item on your menu can save you from a lot of wasted pastries. 
What Does It Cost To Create?
    Every baked good costs a certain amount to make and that cost includes such things as wear on the equipment and the ingredients that you use. Do you have to buy a special ingredient that you will only use for this one item on your menu? The item might need special equipment to make, too. It's important to work out how much you spend to make something before adding it to a menu so you can calculate if it is worth the investment and how you can price it appropriately.
How Does An Item Fit Into Your Business?
   You have already set a certain tone for your bakery, partly by the decorations in the store and the advertising, but mostly by the type of things you sell. So, before you add an item to your menu, you have to ask if it contributes to the tone. Does it fit the niche you cater to? Does it fit into your business's general outlook? For instance, it might make sense to add cheesecakes to your cake shop, but it might not make much sense in a bakery focusing on health food. 
    If you do decide to add items to your menu and you need equipment to bake them, you are in luck. Topos Mondial sells refurbished and new bakery equipment, and we pride ourselves on the variety and quality of the items they have. Please feel free to contact us.
 

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